FreeBSD identifying failed disk

Posted by & filed under Hardware.

Using the sas2ircu utility from LSI, we can blink the drive LED to help ID the failed drive correctly. Of course this requires a LSI card. Some LSI cards may need to use the sas3ircu utility instead. There have been some reports from the interwebs that this utility failed to blink the correct drive, but I have not experienced this myself.

As always use the supercomputer between your ears to ensure the physical serial and the serial reported by the system match, etc etc.

Back to the sas2ircu utility in a moment. We need to first acquire the serial number of the failed disk. For a system that is multipath, we can find the actual dev names by running the following to locate a disk in the fail state:

Now we can see da16 is failed. Time to get the serial number of that disk. Or da43. they are the same just multipaths.

Save that serial number for the next step.

Smartctl also outputs other useful information about the drive, statistics, etc. Worth checking out, but not relevant here.

Next, we can display the disks attached to one of those controllers. Be sure to input the correct serial number in the grep command:

Get the enclosure and slot # of the failed drive and turn the led on:

Turn the led off:

NOTE: If you are replacing a disk that is multipath, e.g. you see something like the following when you offline and remove a disk, ensure that the LED above is OFF or GEOM_MULTIPATH will not pickup the new disk as multipath. See the below log for what happens when a disk is inserted with the LED blinking Vs not blinking:

 

Finding failed multipath issues in FreeNAS

Posted by & filed under Linux, Server Admin.

I have two drives, dsa3 and da4 which are showing multipath errors. In order to find the physical drives:

Drive serials can also be obtained via:

 

pfSense Firewall / Router

Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

pfSense is a free, open source customized distribution of FreeBSD tailored for use as a firewall and router. In addition to being a powerful, flexible firewalling and routing platform, it includes a long list of related features and a package system allowing further expandability without adding bloat and potential security vulnerabilities to the base distribution. pfSense is a popular project with more than 1 million downloads since its inception, and proven in countless installations ranging from small home networks protecting a PC and an Xbox to large corporations, universities and other organizations protecting thousands of network devices.

This project started in 2004 as a fork of the m0n0wall project, but focused towards full PC installations rather than the embedded hardware focus of m0n0wall. pfSense also offers an embedded image for Compact Flash based installations, however it is not our primary focus.

www.pfsense.org/