Extending a volume online

Posted by & filed under Server Admin.

I was attempting to resize a GPT partition ( http://natesbox.com/blog/extending-logical-volume-online/ ). Expanded the physical disk from 4TB to 6TB. Found that fdisk reported the disk size to be 6TB, but would not let me use any of the additional sectors:

Disk /dev/sda: 6 TiB, 6597069766656 bytes, 12884901888 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: E3374C46-FDAA-4FA0-AFD2-1C861700B6EA

Device Start End Sectors Size Type
/dev/sda1 2048 4095 2048 1M BIOS boot
/dev/sda2 4096 503807 499712 244M Linux filesystem
/dev/sda3 503808 8589932543 8589428736 4T Linux LVM

Note the disk says it has 12884901888 sectors, but I can’t expand it past the 8589428736’th sector of /dev/sda3

Running the v command in fdisk reports:

Command (m for help): v
MyLBA mismatch with real position at backup header.
1 error detected.

Found this article: serverfault.com/questions/833231/after-h…

This recommends using gdisk to repair the issue as the backup partition table wasn’t moved to the end of the new geometry:

root@mdm-backup-01:~# gdisk /dev/sda
GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 1.0.1

Partition table scan:
MBR: protective
BSD: not present
APM: not present
GPT: present

Found valid GPT with protective MBR; using GPT.

Command (? for help): r

Recovery/transformation command (? for help): v

Problem: The secondary header’s self-pointer indicates that it doesn’t reside
at the end of the disk. If you’ve added a disk to a RAID array, use the ‘e’
option on the experts’ menu to adjust the secondary header’s and partition
table’s locations.

Identified 1 problems!

Recovery/transformation command (? for help): x

Expert command (? for help): e
Relocating backup data structures to the end of the disk

Expert command (? for help): v

No problems found. 4294971325 free sectors (2.0 TiB) available in 2
segments, the largest of which is 4294969311 (2.0 TiB) in size.

Expert command (? for help): w

Final checks complete. About to write GPT data. THIS WILL OVERWRITE EXISTING
PARTITIONS!!

Do you want to proceed? (Y/N): y
OK; writing new GUID partition table (GPT) to /dev/sda.
Warning: The kernel is still using the old partition table.
The new table will be used at the next reboot or after you
run partprobe(8) or kpartx(8)
The operation has completed successfully.



Extending a logical volume online

Posted by & filed under Server Admin, VMWare.

I’ve written about this in past posts. Here is an updated article straight from VMWare: https://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1006371

 

  1. Power off the virtual machine.
  2. Edit the virtual machine settings and extend the virtual disk size. For more information, see Increasing the size of a virtual disk (1004047).
  3. Power on the virtual machine.
  4. Identify the device name, which is by default /dev/sda, and confirm the new size by running the command:

    # fdisk -l

  5. Create a new primary partition:
    1. Run the command:

      # fdisk /dev/sda (depending the results of the step 4)

    2. Press p to print the partition table to identify the number of partitions. By default, there are 2: sda1 and sda2.
    3. Press n to create a new primary partition.
    4. Press p for primary.
    5. Press 3 for the partition number, depending on the output of the partition table print.
    6. Press Enter two times.
    7. Press t to change the system’s partition ID.
    8. Press 3 to select the newly creation partition.
    9. Type 8e to change the Hex Code of the partition for Linux LVM.
    10. Press w to write the changes to the partition table.
  6. Restart the virtual machine.
  7. Run this command to verify that the changes were saved to the partition table and that the new partition has an 8e type:

    # fdisk -l

  8. Run this command to convert the new partition to a physical volume:

    Note: The number for the sda can change depending on system setup. Use the sda number that was created in step 5.

    # pvcreate /dev/sda3

  9. Run this command to extend the physical volume:

    # vgextend VolGroup00 /dev/sda3

    Note: To determine which volume group to extend, use the command vgdisplay.

  10. Run this command to verify how many physical extents are available to the Volume Group:

    # vgdisplay VolGroup00 | grep “Free”

  11. Run the following command to extend the Logical Volume:

    # lvextend -L+#G /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00

    Where # is the number of Free space in GB available as per the previous command. Use the full number output from Step 10 including any decimals.

    Note: To determine which logical volume to extend, use the command lvdisplay.

  12. Run the following command to expand the ext3 filesystem online, inside of the Logical Volume:

    # ext2online /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00

    Notes:

    • Use resize2fs instead of ext2online if it is not a Red Hat virtual machine.
    • By default, Red Hat and CentOS 7 use the XFS file system you can grow the file system by running the xfs_growfs command.
  13. Run the following command to verify that the / filesystem has the new space available:

    # df -h /

DBAN — Securely Wipe Disk Drives

Posted by & filed under Forensics, Server Admin.

DBAN is a means of ensuring due diligence in computer recycling, a way of preventing identity theft if you want to sell a computer, and a good way to totally clean a Microsoft Windows installation of viruses and spyware. DBAN prevents or thoroughly hinders all known techniques of hard disk forensic analysis.

www.dban.org/