4:3 and 16:9 Screen Resolutions

Posted by & filed under Hardware.

List of 4:3 Monitor Resolutions
Resolution – Aspect ratio

640×480—–4:3
800×600—–4:3
1024×768—–4:3
1152×864—–4:3
1280×960—–4:3
1400×1050—–4:3
1600×1200—–4:3
2048×1536—–4:3
3200×2400—–4:3
4000×3000—–4:3
6400×4800—–4:3

List of 16:9 Widescreen Resolutions
Resolution – Aspect ratio

852×480—–16:9
1280×720—–16:9
1365×768—–16:9
1600×900—–16:9
1920×1080—–16:9

List of 16:10 Widescreen Resolutions
Resolution – Aspect ratio

1440×900—–16:10
1680×1050—–16:10
1920×1200—–16:10
2560×1600—–16:10
3840×2400—–16:10
7680×4800—–16:10

Bridging Amps and Ohm Loads

Posted by & filed under Audio, Electronic, Hardware.

Amplifier bridging is simply using 2 channels of an amplifier to drive a common load. For 2 channel amplifiers, one left signal and one right signal is used to drive a mono speaker load. Keep in mind that mono and bridging are not necessarily the same. Mono means that there’s only one output signal. There could be more than one speaker but each speaker will have the same output. Bridging means that you are using more than one source of power to drive a load (speaker). The sources of power are one each output from either channel of the amplifier. A long time ago, amplifiers had signal on the positive output speaker terminals only. To bridge one of those amplifiers, you’d have to use some means to invert the signal on one channel (remember the old ‘bridging modules’ for Orion amplifiers?). Today’s bridgeable amplifiers have an inverted channel as part of their design. For many amplifiers, the left positive and right negative are are the signal outputs. A few use the left negative and the right positive. Others still (mostly mono amplifiers that are to be used in bridged pairs) require that you choose 0° or 180° via a switch to invert the signal.

www.bcae1.com/bridging.htm

I HATE WMI

Posted by & filed under Programming, WMI.

Trying to retrieve the wireless stats:

VB.Net Class:
Public Class clsWMI
Private objOS As ManagementObjectSearcher
Private objCS As ManagementObjectSearcher
Private objMgmt As ManagementObject
Private m_strComputerName As String
Private m_strManufacturer As String
Private m_StrModel As String
Private m_strOSName As String
Private m_strOSVersion As String
Private m_strSystemType As String
Private m_strTPM As String
Private m_strWindowsDir As String

Public Sub New()

objOS = New ManagementObjectSearcher("SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem")
objCS = New ManagementObjectSearcher("SELECT * FROM Win32_ComputerSystem")
For Each objMgmt In objOS.Get

m_strOSName = objMgmt("name").ToString()
m_strOSVersion = objMgmt("version").ToString()
m_strComputerName = objMgmt("csname").ToString()
m_strWindowsDir = objMgmt("windowsdirectory").ToString()
Next

For Each objMgmt In objCS.Get
m_strManufacturer = objMgmt("manufacturer").ToString()
m_StrModel = objMgmt("model").ToString()
m_strSystemType = objMgmt("systemtype").ToString
m_strTPM = objMgmt("totalphysicalmemory").ToString()
Next
End Sub

Public ReadOnly Property ComputerName()
Get
ComputerName = m_strComputerName
End Get

End Property
Public ReadOnly Property Manufacturer()
Get
Manufacturer = m_strManufacturer
End Get

End Property
Public ReadOnly Property Model()
Get
Model = m_StrModel
End Get

End Property
Public ReadOnly Property OsName()
Get
OsName = m_strOSName
End Get

End Property

Public ReadOnly Property OSVersion()
Get
OSVersion = m_strOSVersion
End Get

End Property
Public ReadOnly Property SystemType()
Get
SystemType = m_strSystemType
End Get

End Property
Public ReadOnly Property TotalPhysicalMemory()
Get
TotalPhysicalMemory = m_strTPM
End Get

End Property

Public ReadOnly Property WindowsDirectory()
Get
WindowsDirectory = m_strWindowsDir
End Get

End Property

End Class

And a way to invoke it:

Dim objWMI As New clsWMI()
With objWMI
Debug.WriteLine("Computer Name = " & .ComputerName)
Debug.WriteLine("Computer Manufacturer = " & .Manufacturer)
Debug.WriteLine("Computer Model = " & .Model)
Debug.WriteLine("OS Name = " & .OsName)
Debug.WriteLine("OS Version = " & .OSVersion)
Debug.WriteLine("System Type = " & .SystemType)
Debug.WriteLine("Total Physical Memory = " & .TotalPhysicalMemory)
Debug.WriteLine("Windows Directory = " & .WindowsDirectory)
End With

And my refrence link dump:

Managing Wireless Network Adaptors with Powershell and WMI

Posted by & filed under Powershell, Programming, Projects, TNSC, Windows.

I have been researching how to create a script that will display network status as well as allow the users to reconnect to the wireless network if needed.

PS C:\Windows\system32> Get-WmiObject -Namespace root\wmi -list | Where-Object { $_.Name -match "MSNdis_80211" }

NameSpace: ROOT\wmi

Name Methods Properties
---- ------- ----------
MSNdis_80211_ReceiveAntennaSelected {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211ReceiveAntennaSelected}
MSNdis_80211_RTSThreshold {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211RTSThreshold}
MSNdis_80211_AddWEP {} {Active, InstanceName, KeyIndex, KeyLength...}
MSNdis_80211_ConfigurationInfo {} {ATIMWindow, BeaconPeriod, ConfigLength, DSConfig...}
MSNdis_80211_ReloadDefaults {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211ReloadDefaults}
MSNdis_80211_BssIdListScan {} {Active, InstanceName, UnusedParameter}
MSNdis_80211_InfrastructureMode {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211InfrastructureMode}
MSNdis_80211_ConfigurationFH {} {DwellTime, FHLength, HopPattern, HopSet}
MSNdis_80211_BaseServiceSetIdent... {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211MacAddress}
MSNdis_80211_ReceivedSignalStrength {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211ReceivedSignalStrength}
MSNdis_80211_NetworkType {} {Ndis80211NetworkType}
MSNdis_80211_PrivacyFilter {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211PrivacyFilter}
MSNdis_80211_TransmitPowerLevel {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211TransmitPowerLevel}
MSNdis_80211_NetworkInfrastructure {} {Ndis80211NetworkInfrastructure}
MSNdis_80211_WLanBssId {} {Ndis80211Configuration, Ndis80211InfrastructureMode, Ndis8...
MSNdis_80211_NetworkTypesSupported {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211NetworkTypes, NumberOfItems}
MSNdis_80211_NetworkTypeInUse {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211NetworkTypeInUse}
MSNdis_80211_RemoveWEP {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211KeyIndex}
MSNdis_80211_NumberOfAntennas {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211NumberOfAntennas}
MSNdis_80211_AuthenticationMode {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211AuthenticationMode}
MSNdis_80211_FragmentationThreshold {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211FragmentationThreshold}
MSNdis_80211_Statistics {} {ACKFailureCount, Active, FailedCount, FCSErrorCount...}
MSNdis_80211_BSSIList {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211BSSIList, NumberOfItems}
MSNdis_80211_WEPStatus {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211WEPStatus}
MSNdis_80211_PowerMode {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211PowerMode}
MSNdis_80211_Configuration {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211Config}
MSNdis_80211_ServiceSetIdentifier {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211SsId}
MSNdis_80211_TransmitAntennaSele... {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211TransmitAntennaSelected}
MSNdis_80211_Disassociate {} {Active, InstanceName, UnusedParameter}
MSNdis_80211_DataRates {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211DataRate}
MSNdis_80211_DesiredDataRates {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211DesiredRate}
MSNdis_80211_ReceivedSignalStren... {} {Active, InstanceName, Ndis80211ReceivedSignalStrengthTrigger}

And also this snippet which will display the network adapters labeled as wireless:

PS C:\Windows\system32> Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_NetworkAdapter | Where-Object {$_.Name -like "*Wireless*"}

ServiceName :
MACAddress :
AdapterType :
DeviceID : 14
Name : Linksys Wireless-G USB Network Adapter
NetworkAddresses :
Speed :

Sources: www.powershellcommunity.org/Forums/tabid…
blogs.technet.com/b/heyscriptingguy/arch…

Wireless Network Scanner in Powershell: defaultset.blogspot.com/2010/04/powershe…

Honda Main Relay Test Procedure

Posted by & filed under Automotive.

1. Remove the main relay.
2. Attach the positive battery terminal to the #4 terminal and the negative battery terminal to the #8 terminal of the main relay. Then check for continuity between the #5 terminal and the #7 terminal of the main relay.
a. If there is continuity, go to step 3.
b. If there is no continuity, replace the relay and retest.
3. Attach the positive battery terminal to the #5 terminal and the negative battery terminal to the #2 terminal of the main relay. Then check for continuity between the #1 terminal and the #3 terminal of the main relay.
a. If there is continuity, go to step 4.
b.If there is no continuity, replace the relay and retest.
4. Attach the positive battery terminal to the #3 terminal and the negative battery terminal to the #8 terminal of the main relay. Then check for continuity between the #5 terminal and the #7 terminal of the main relay.
a. If there is continuity, the relay is OK.
b. If the fuel pump still does not work, go to harness test.
c. If there is no continuity, replace the relay and retest.

Configuring Wireless in Windows thru the Command Line

Posted by & filed under Networking, WiFi, Windows.

So using the netsh wlan command allows us to manipulate the various properties of a wireless connection. Other potentially cool stuff:

  • netsh wlan set tra yes – Enables wireless debug traces in %WINDIR%\tracing\wireless
  • netsh wlan
  • Creating/moving wireless profiles quickly
  • There is more, but this is prolly what I need to use when I write a app for a client to view wireless connection status.

    Source: www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutor…